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Jackson's Museum of Wildlife Art

A new sculpture trail at the National Museum of Wildlife Art in Jackson, Wyo., overlooks the National Elk Refuge.

Tim Shinabarger's Black Timber Bugler forever seeks a mate.
Photo caption
Tim Shinabarger's Black Timber Bugler forever seeks a mate.

What happens when an urban landscape architect tackles an assignment at the base of the Tetons? See for yourself along a new sculpture trail at the National Museum of Wildlife Art, near Jackson, Wyo.

“I’ve probably never worked in such a changing landscape,” says designer Walter Hood, whose recent installations include gardens at San Francisco’s ultramodern de Young Museum and public spaces in the Hill District of Pittsburgh, Pa. “Every time I visited, I saw something else.” His vision soon outgrew the museum staff ’s ideas. “They wanted a trail around a parking lot,” he says.

About 30 sculptures will eventually line the undulating trail, which winds three-quarters of a mile across a butte above the National Elk Refuge. Some pieces—among them Black Timber Bugler by Tim Shinabarger—are already in place. Others going in this year include Isis, a 10-foot-tall casting by British artist Simon Gudgeon, and Buffalo Trail, a 64-foot-long grouping of seven bison by Richard Loffler. Wide wooden benches now dot the trail, which is open to visitors without charge. (307) 733-5771, wildlifeart.org.

Photography courtesy of Tim Shinabarger

This article was first published in July 2012. Some facts may have aged gracelessly. Please call ahead to verify information.