Moscow, Idaho: Five Things We Love

No onion domes in this Moscow—just gourmet chocolate, local wine, and great jazz.

Dee Daniels, image

Vocalist Dee Daniels plays in Moscow.

Set in the Palouse—an agricultural region famed for its own breed of horse—Moscow is home to the University of Idaho as well as wineries, chocolatiers, and a jazz festival that has showcased top players such as Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie, and Bobby McFerrin. Area code is 208.

  • Dark chocolate spiked with chile, lime, and tequila at Cowgirl Chocolates gives tasters a hint why online orders crashed the Internet in Moscow the day owner Marilyn Lysohir released her spicy confections. Catch her holiday booth at the Palouse Mall. 882-4098, cowgirlchocolates.com.
  • Acres of black spots on view at the Appaloosa Museum and Heritage Center reflect the distinguishing feature of North America's first horse breed, developed by the Nez Perce Indians. The word appaloosa comes from the region's name. 882-5578, appaloosamuseum.org.
  • Woodland honeycomb, harvested locally, graces plates at Nectar Restaurant & Wine Bar along with assorted cheeses, including Cougar Gold from the university creamery nearby. 882-5914, moscownectar.com.
  • Camas Prairie Winery is northern Idaho's oldest, and it charges just $1 for five tastes of wines, sparkling wines, and meads made with local wine grapes, fruit, and honey. 882-0214, camasprairiewinery.com.
  • The University of Idaho Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival features contemporary jazz greats. This year's event, February 20 through 23, includes violinist Regina Carter, who has performed with Lauryn Hill, Billy Joel, and Aretha Franklin. 885-6765, uidaho.edu/jazzfest.

Photography courtesy of UI Photographic Services

This article was first published in January/February 2013. Some facts may have aged gracefully. Please call ahead to verify information.

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