Blogs

Seattle: Nettletown another in a long line of appealing local eateries

One thing I love about Seattle restaurants is how many of them showcase the phenomenal bounty of the Pacific Northwest—from salmon to fiddlehead ferns to huckleberries.

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Seattle: Pike/Pine neighborhood chock full of delights

While in Seattle I had lunch with architect, urban planner, and former city council member Peter Steinbreuck. Wanting to get his take about how Seattle has changed over the past 20 years, I asked him about the city's current crop of up-and-coming neighborhoods.

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London, Paris, Rome ... Seattle

Call me a Seattle superfan. The city may readily inspire images of coffeehouses and grunge, but this Pacific Northwest capital of cool is also part Disneyland, featuring spectacular attractions like the monorail and the underground tour, to name just a couple.

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Seattle’s grunge roots reveal rifts in team VIA

Can you hum “Smells Like Teen Spirit”? Can you whistle “All Apologies”? The topic gives me a chance to talk about one of my favorite aspects of working at VIA: story meetings.

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The Hat Man of Salt Lake City

While cowboy hats seem to be the bread and butter of J.W. Hats, hatmaker Jim Whittington pays tribute to all kinds of hats.

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Choteau, Mont.: History meets small-town culture

The eastern side of the Continental Divide in Montana is the plains. It’s not flat, but it is grassland, a lot of it, allowing you feel like you can see forever.

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Farmstand Adventures in Napa

Wine-tasting may be the primary activity of choice for visitors to the Napa Valley, but vino isn’t this verdant area’s only agricultural product of note.

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The Birds are the Thing at Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge

For nature-lovers and photo hounds, a must-visit site en route to Enchanted Forest (which I wrote about for the March/April 2011 issue of Via) is the nearly 3,000 acres of Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge, just a few miles away.

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Where to enjoy Joshua trees, while you can

A few years ago, people who love Joshua trees—myself included—got some bad news. Scientists projected that within 100 years, this gnarl-limbed desert dweller will disappear entirely from Arizona, Utah, and many parts of California and Nevada.

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Augusta, Mont.: Wonder under the Front

I live in western Montana. Getting to Al Wiseman and the Old North Trail (which I did for a piece in the March/April 2011 issue of VIA) means crossing the Continental Divide, the Rockies, at Rogers Pass.

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